Fundamentals of Composition ~ ENG 075
Dr. Jonathan Alexander
Office, Parker Center, 319-F (Office hours TBA)
609-894-9311 or 856-222-9311 (x1123)
E-mail: jalexander@bcc.edu
Online syllabus: http://staff.bcc.edu/faculty_websites/jalexand/075syl.htm

 

Required materials:
The Writer’s Response (BCC Custom Edition) McDonald and Salomone, 2008.
Notebook to record class information and write journal responses.

USB flash drive for saving material while in the computer lab.

 

Description: This composition course is designed to reinforce students’ abilities to consider, develop and organize relevant support for a topic and to maintain standard usage and mechanics. Learning activities emphasize writing as a process. Good communication skills are one of the most important factors in personal and professional success. This course focuses on writing effective paragraphs and essays and improving grammar, mechanics and style. With punctual attendance, consistent effort, and active involvement in learning activities, the student should be able to construct a five-paragraph essay which will include an appropriate title, a clearly stated thesis statement and plan, three paragraphs providing effective, adequate and specific support for the thesis, and an appropriate introduction and conclusion.

 

Learning Objectives: At the end of English 075, you should be able to:

§   Demonstrate knowledge of grammar, usage, sentence structure and mechanics;

§   Utilize the writing process to compose meaningful paragraphs and essays that reflect unity and coherence;

§   Compose a four- or five-paragraph essay on an argumentative topic with a thesis, hook, supporting elements, effective transitions, and a conclusion;

§   Participate within a group setting aimed at achieving similar goals;

§   Create and maintain a notebook journal of responses and reactions to various topics;

§   Compose, within a specified timeframe, a competent and meaningful argumentative essay that exhibits proper grammar, usage, sentence structure and mechanics.

 

COURSE EXPECTATIONS:

Attendance: If the student is to profit from any course, he or she must attend class on a consistent basis.

 

Students must attend all classes for the full duration of each session. Should you need to miss a class for observance of religious holidays, jury duty, military duty, bereavement, or illness, you must notify the instructor by telephone or e-mail either prior to or within 24 hours after the class. Without such communication, students forfeit the right to make up missed work. If such communication is made, students will be permitted to make up missed work at the beginning of the following class meeting.

 

Entering class late or leaving class early (without prior authorization) is considered disrespectful and will not be tolerated.

 

Academic Etiquette: Students will respect themselves, their peers and their instructors by considering the following:

 

It is understandable that the world does not stop for English class; however, cell phones must be kept on silent. No calls are to be made or received during class. If you are expecting an important call during the class meeting time, notify me prior to class and quietly excuse yourself if the call is received. No text-messaging or game-playing will be tolerated, and you will be asked to leave if you cannot respect this request.

While in the computer lab, students are permitted to access personal information only until the class session begins. No personal work (including e-mail, social-networking, surfing, or other class assignments) may be conducted on the computers while our class is in session. Such behavior is disrespectful and inappropriate, and such students will be excused from the class meeting without exception.

Students who wish to use the restrooms may do so as necessary by quietly leaving and re-entering the room. If a student believes he or she will require an absence of more than a few minutes, it is his responsibility to notify me accordingly.

 

Communication: Many means of communication are available to the student including telephone, e-mail and mailboxes, and it expected that students avail themselves of these opportunities as needed.

 

If you leave a message on my office voice-mail (x1123), please remember to speak clearly and provide your name, course information, and phone number if you request a return call.

 

If you contact me via e-mail (jalexander@bcc.edu), always include your full name and class information in the subject line. Too often students forget to sign e-mail or have e-mail addresses without obvious identifiers. If you do not include your name in the subject line of your e-mail message, I will not open it.

 

Students who send me e-mail and do not receive a reply of any kind within 48 hours should assume it was never received. Such e-mails should be resent. I do not mind receiving redundant messages if you are unsure whether your message was transmitted (though I may only reply to the first). If your message doesn’t present itself as urgent, I may reply quickly and briefly and ask to get back to you before long. Do not ask me if I’ve received your e-mail message if you haven’t checked first.

 

Students who send e-mails containing attachments MUST save these documents with one of the following extensions: DOC, DOCX, TXT, WPS or RTF.

 

The box on my office door (Parker 319-F) and my assigned box in Laurel Hall 121 (faculty lounge) are for students to submit documents of any kind. If you choose to slide documents under my office door, you take the risk of having it accidentally swept up by housekeeping.

 

Class Assignments:

§   All work written and submitted should utilize standard rules of grammar, sentence organization, paragraph organization, and diction.

§   All formal papers are to be typed, appropriately titled, double spaced, stapled, and carefully proofread.     (see poem at end of syllabus)

§   All assignments are due on the date specified on the syllabus without exception. Assignments which are not submitted during the class session they are due will be penalized 15% for each subsequent day they are late.

§   When a student is absent the day an assignment is due, he or she must submit the assignment as an attachment via e-mail on or before the date it is due. (see above for information about sending attachments)

§   Since students are provided with all assignments and deadlines on the first day of the semester, excuses such as “crashed computers,” “misplaced data,” “misplaced disks,” or “empty printer ink cartridges” will not be accepted. It is recommended that all computer work be saved twice (on your computer’s hard drive and on a portable flash drive).

 

Plagiarism will not be tolerated under any circumstances. Be aware that plagiarism includes (but is not limited to) copying someone else’s words without crediting the source; paraphrasing someone else’s words without crediting the source; using someone else’s ideas without crediting the source (even if rephrased in your own words); using facts not universally known which are obtained from a source without crediting the source; asking someone else to write your paper, either in whole or in part; or obtaining a paper or portion thereof by any means and submitting it as an original document. The penalty for plagiarism is failure of the assignment and potentially failure of the course (at the instructor’s discretion), and it may result in suspension or expulsion from the College (at the discretion of the Student Affairs Committee). Please refer to the current BCC Student Handbook for additional information regarding College regulations and the handling of plagiarism.

 


Student Responsibilities:

Flash Drive: Students are to bring a flash drive to each class session that meets in the lab (Thursdays).


Notebook: Course materials must be kept in a suitable notebook dedicated to this class.

Journal: Regular journal entries are scheduled. A full, 100-word entry is required for each of the 20 topics. Entries must be typed, double-spaced, proofread, and printed to be brought to the scheduled class. Careless, thoughtless or “rushed” entries do not accomplish the anticipated goal and therefore are not acceptable.

Writing Assignments: The five writing assignments (WA) are the “tests” of writing competency. Students should follow the writing process for each paper including prewriting, drafting, and revising. All writing assignments must be typed and double-spaced, using a standard 12-point font. One-inch margins and a title are required. The title is not to be placed in quotes or underlined; there is no period after the title. The following heading must be included on the top left side of the first page of all writing assignments:

Full Name                                                                   (Sample)          Jonathan Alexander
ENG 075                                                                                             ENG 075
Assignment  Name and Number                                                         Journal #1 (or WA #1)
Due Date                                                                                             September 11, 2009


Grammar Exercises: Daily exercises are scheduled in the textbook and online (via the syllabus website) which will allow the student to sharpen his or her skills in various areas of grammar, usage and sentence structure. All exercises can be completed in the book, printed from the internet, or written in the student’s notebook; periodic checks by the instructor should show consistent and accurate work. These exercises will also help prepare students for the editing/proofreading quiz.

Participation: It is requested that students share their journal entries in class each day. Students who allow each other to open up often find that the classroom environment becomes a comfortable zone of learning, sharing and cooperation. Although students will never be required to read a journal entry if they prefer not to (perhaps because of especially personal material), it is recommended that these students make it a point to share the entries with the instructor at a later moment to ensure that they receive appropriate credit for the writing exercises.


Graded Assignments

Date

Points

JOURNAL QUESTIONS

Various

20

WRITING ASSIGNMENT 1—Profile

Session 4

10

WRITING ASSIGNMENT 2—Place

Session 9

10

WRITING ASSIGNMENT 3—Narrative

Session 13

10

WRITING ASSIGNMENT 4—Person

Session 19

10

WRITING ASSIGNMENT 5—Argument

Session 25

10

PROOFREADING / EDITING QUIZ

Session 25

20

PARTICIPATION

 

10

TOTAL

 

100 pts

FINAL ESSAY 1

Session 26

O / P / U

FINAL ESSAY 2

Session 27

O / P / U

FINAL ESSAY 3 (if needed)

Session 28

O / P / U

REQUIREMENTS FOR PASSING ENGLISH 075:
~ Attend all classes and participate in discussions and exercises
~ Hand in all assignments on time as scheduled
~ Complete all 20 journal entries on time as scheduled
~ Complete textbook exercises as assigned
~ Earn at least 70 points for all graded assignments

~ Earn at least 7 points on two of the three final essay exams

 

IF ANY ITEM ABOVE IS NOT MET, ONE CANNOT BE ADMITTED TO ENGLISH 101.

Course grades will be averaged and final grades will be given as follows:

An Outstanding grade is earned when a student completes all requirements as listed above and averages at least 9 points on the five essays (90%);

A Passing grade is earned when a student completes all requirements as listed above and averages between 7 and 8 points on the five essays (70% - 89%);

An Unsatisfactory grade indicates that a student has not met one or more of the criteria listed above; therefore, the student is not ready to proceed to English 101.

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Schedule of Assignments: Assignments (including text exercises and journal responses) are to be completed prior to the date on which they are listed below. No text work or journals are to be done in class unless specified by the instructor. Note: This class meets in a classroom on Tuesdays and a computer lab on Thursdays; be certain to bring your USB device every Thursday to save work done in class.

 

SESSION 1: Thur (LAB), Sept 2
Introduction to English 075; discussion of assignments and use of computer lab

 

SESSION 2: Tues (CLASS), Sept 7
Text:
pp. 3-7, “Writing Process”
Classwork: WA-1 (Brainstorming, interviews)

 

SESSION 3: Thur (LAB), Sept 9
Text: p
p. 15-16, “Topic Sentences” (Exercise 1.1); pp. 19-20 “Prewriting”; pp. 22-23 “Rewriting”
Classwork: WA-1 (Independent drafting and revising)

 

SESSION 4: Tues (CLASS), Sept 14
Text:
pp. 33-34 “The Embedding Process” (Exercises 1.10, 1.11 and 1.12)

Journal 1: What has been your proudest accomplishment to date? What about it makes you proud? Did it require special preparation or natural talent? Do you owe anyone else for achieving this goal or was it completely your own? How did others respond to this accomplishment?

Classwork: WA-1 Presentations (Group one)

 

SESSION 5: Thur (LAB), Sept 16
Text:
pp. 67-68 “Sentence Combining” (Exercise 2.2 and 2.3)
Classwork: WA-1 Presentations (Group two)
*Submit WA-1

 

SESSION 6: Tues (CLASS), Sept 21
Text:
pp. 70-71 “Semi-colons” (Exercise 2.4); pp. 73-74 “Parallel Structure”
Classwork: WA-2 (Brainstorming)

 


SESSION 7: Thur (LAB), Sept 23
Text:
pp. 78-81 “Brief / Extended Examples” (Exercise 3.2); pp. 85-89 “Introductions and Conclusions”
Journal 2: When do you remember feeling really embarrassed or shameful? What caused these feelings (events, people, actions)? Was anyone else involved? How did you overcome it?

Classwork: WA-2 (Drafting)

 

SESSION 8: Tues (CLASS), Sept 28
Text:
p. 108 “Subordinating Conjunctions and Relative Pronouns” (Exercise 3.7 and 3.8)
Journal 3: What have you done that you consider to be really adventurous? Are you generally this way? Did you regret the decision or not? What did others think? Were you spontaneous or methodical?
Classwork: WA-2 (Peer review, pp. 26-27)

 

SESSION 9: Thur (LAB), Sept 30
Text:
pp. 115-116 “Unity”; pp. 117-120 “Coherence”; p. 123 “Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences” (Exercise 4.4)
Journal 4: Name your three best personality traits and provide a detailed example for each. What areas of your life benefit the most from these good qualities? Do they come naturally or have they required great work and effort?

*SUBMIT WA-2

 

SESSION 10: Tues (CLASS), Oct 5
Text:
pp. 147-148 “Dangling Modifiers” (Exercise 4.7)
Journal 5: Name your three worst personality traits and provide a detailed example for each. What areas of your life suffer the most from these unfortunate qualities? How do you try to improve them?
Classwork: WA-3 (Brainstorming)

 

SESSION 11: Thur (LAB), Oct 7
Text:
pp. 188-190 “Appositives” (Exercises 5.5 and 5.7)
Journal 6: Consider this: the local authorities have told you to evacuate your home because a dangerous storm is approaching. You are certain your loved ones and pets will be safe. As you move to a secure area, you find you only have enough time to retrieve one portable item from your home (that which you could easily carry)—perhaps a favorite or sentimental object. Name the object you would take and argue for its relative importance to you.
Classwork: WA-3 (Drafting)

 

SESSION 12: Tues (CLASS), Oct 12
Text:
p. 196 “Audience and Purpose”; pp. 197-199 “Evaluating Support” (Exercise 6.1)
Journal 7: Whom do you know that you really admire and why? What has this person done that is so admirable? How does this person’s actions influence you? Are you aware of how this individual became the person he or she is/was?
Classwork: WA-3 (Peer review, pp. 26-27)

 

SESSION 13: Thur (LAB), Oct 14
Text:
pp. 315-318 “Clauses” (Exercises 9.1 and 9.2)
Journal 8: Describe the characteristics of an ideal friend, providing valid examples from your life and experiences. Whom do you know that displays—or approaches closely—these characteristics?

*SUBMIT WA-3

*SUBMIT JOURNALS 1-8

 

SESSION 14: Tues (CLASS), Oct 19
Text:
pp. 321-323 “Sentence Fragments” (Exercise 10.1)
Journal 9: If you knew you’d be locked in an elevator for six hours, and you could pick any human being (living or dead), with whom would you like to spend that time? What would you talk about? What would you ask or tell?

Classwork: WA-4 (Brainstorming)

 

SESSION 15: Thur (LAB), Oct 21
Text:
pp. 325-327 “Fused Sentences and Comma Splices” (Exercise 11.1)
Journal 10: Describe the strangest thing you’ve ever seen or done. What about it was so strange? What did others think?

Classwork: WA-4 (Drafting)

SESSION 16: Tues (CLASS), Oct 26
Text:
pp. 337-340 “Subject-Verb Agreement” (Exercises 13.1 and 13.2)
Journal 11: Explain your worst school-related experience ever. Who was involved, what happened, and how has it impacted you? (Consider academic performance, peer-pressure, cheating, faculty/student relationships, parent/child relationships)
Classwork: WA-4 (Drafting)

 

SESSION 17: Thur (LAB), Oct 28
Text:
pp. 343-346 “Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement” (Exercise 14.1); pp. 347-348 “Unclear Pronoun Reference”
Journal 12: How would you define the typical community college student? Do you fit that model, why or why not? Do you know anyone who does? What kinds of unfair stereotypes are projected by society about community colleges? Can these be overcome?

Classwork: WA-4 (Drafting)

 

SESSION 18: Tues (CLASS), Nov 2
Text:
pp. 351-355 “Pronoun Case” (Exercise 15.1)
Journal 13: Successful people often set realistic, attainable goals. How do you expect your life in five years to be different from the life you live now? How do you expect it to be the same? Be as specific as possible.
Classwork: WA-4 (Peer review, p. 139-140)

 

SESSION 19: Thur (LAB), Nov 4
Text:
pp. 357-360 “Modifiers” (Exercise 16.1)
Journal 14: What is your definition of “freedom?” When do you feel most free? When do you feel least free? Who do you know that is free? Who is not?
*SUBMIT WA-4

*SUBMIT JOURNALS 9-14

 

SESSION 20: Tues (CLASS), Nov 9
Text:
pp. 363-368 “Commas” (Exercises 17.1 and 17.2)
Journal 15:
If a rich relative left you $1,000,000 with the condition that all the money must be spent within one week and may not be saved, invested, disposed of, destroyed, or given away, how would you spend the money?
Classwork: WA-5 (Brainstorming)

 

SESSION 21: Thur (LAB), Nov 11
Text:
pp. 371-372 “Semicolons and Colons” (Exercise 18.1)
Journal 16:
In what ways do men have it easier in this world? In what ways do women? Children? People of color? The elderly?

Classwork: WA-5 (Drafting)

 

SESSION 22: Tues (CLASS), Nov 16
Text:
pp. 375-376 “Apostrophe” (Exercise 19.1)
Journal 17:
If you could re-live any five-minute period of your life (or re-do any one act or decision), what would you choose and why? What would you do or say differently?

Classwork: WA-5 (Drafting)

 

SESSION 23: Thur (LAB), Nov 18
Text:
pp. 379-380 “Quotation Marks” (Exercise 20.1)
Journal 18:
What surprised you the most about your current semester in college? Regarding your classes, teachers, and your study habits, what were you discouraged by? What were you pleased about? If this is your first semester, what were you not prepared for? If this is not your first semester, how has past experience help you this time?

Classwork: WA-5 (Drafting)

 


SESSION 24: Tues (CLASS), Nov 23
Journal 19:
Choose and describe a person from the past that you think has made a significant impact on society. How has the individual influenced the world in general and your life in particular?

Classwork: WA-5 (Peer review, pp. 139-140)
Student Conferences as needed

College is closed Thursday, November 25, 2010

 

SESSION 25: Tues (CLASS), Nov 30
Proofreading / Editing Quiz

Journal 20: How have you changed personally over this semester? What have you discovered about yourself? What is the most important thing you learned outside of the classroom this semester? What one piece of advice would you leave for next semester’s students?
*SUBMIT WA-5

*SUBMIT JOURNALS 15-20

 

SESSION 26: Thur (LAB), Dec 2
FINAL ESSAY #1

 

SESSION 27: Tues (CLASS), Dec 7
FINAL ESSAY #2

 

SESSION 28: Thur (LAB), Dec 9
FINAL ESSAY #3 (if needed) 

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Writing Assignment #1 - Profile of a Classmate (due session 4)

Since this course will require you to work with classmates, critique each other’s work, and participate in a variety of activities on a regular basis, this assignment will ask you to work with just one other student as an initial step. You will use questions to gather information and demonstrate your competency in writing a short paragraph.

This assignment is to be one paragraph long containing 10-15 sentences. The purpose of the paragraph is to introduce your classmate to the rest of the class. You are to begin with the following topic sentence:

“I find (insert name) to be a fascinating person because (insert three reasons).”

Before you pair up, develop a list of 10-12 questions to ask. You might start with some of the following ideas: name, hometown, birthplace, high school attended, major field of college study, career goal, present job(s), favorite leisure activity, memorable experiences, happiest moment, etc. Be sure, though, to focus on what makes the person interesting, special or unique. Don’t rely on details that may sound like familiar experiences.

During your interview, remember the goal is to learn enough about the person to write an interesting paragraph. It is not necessary to answer all the questions, and you might develop other questions as the interview progresses. Each person will be allowed only ten minutes to ask questions. Be certain to jot down key notes to help you remember because you’ll be responsible for representing your partner accurately and without bias. When you are being interviewed, keep in mind that anything you mention may be included in your partner’s report about you, so keep ultra-personal information guarded if you don’t want it shared.

Next, group the ideas you have gathered. Decide on what details you need to include and what can be omitted. Organize the points you will write about in the order of their importance. You may choose to use some sort of outline to help guide your thought process.

Write the paragraph discussing several interesting aspects of the person you interviewed. Review and revise the paragraph as necessary. Be sure the ideas suggested in the topic sentence are explained with details in the supporting sentences which follow. You will read the paragraph to the class as a way for the class to become familiar with each other.

Writing Assignment #2 - Description of a Place (due session 9)

We are frequently asked to describe something or someone, which can be especially difficult if the person requesting the description has no knowledge of the subject. Good descriptions create a picture in one’s mind. Descriptive details are gathered by observing the subject and writing down reactions and impressions using the five senses—sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell—as well as the dominant feelings or moods the subject provokes.

Write one well-developed paragraph of 10-15 sentences describing a familiar and interesting place that can be observed while standing in one spot. The topic sentence must state what place is being described and must offer the dominant impression (to be further detailed in the following sentences). Brainstorm and free-write about a familiar place and the overall feeling it gives you. You might brainstorm by listing places that give you some of the following impressions: beautiful, pleasant, peaceful, friendly, hostile, scary, active, dangerous, depressing, quiet, luxurious, exciting, boring, stimulating, relaxing, cheerful, unsightly, gloomy. Use specific details to capture the subject in words and create an image in the reader’s mind. Write in present tense as if it is being experienced at the current moment.

Draft your paragraph using clear, complete and correct sentences. Use relevant, concrete, and specific details and examples to add interest, liveliness and power to your writing. Use descriptive adjectives, adverbs, and nouns to stimulate interest, but do not use large, unconventional words simply for the sake of trying to “build up” the language. Use transitions to show space relationships, such as above, beyond, between, near, around and below. Remember to appeal to the reader’s senses and feelings.

Check the paragraph for adequate support and detail, coherence and unity. Improve the clarity and style by using appropriate English, action verbs, sentence variety and exact language. As a last step, check for faulty sentence structure, agreement problems and misspellings. Use the editing features on your computer as well as a dictionary and thesaurus.

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Writing Assignment #3 – Narrative (due session 13)

We tell stories all the time. The most interesting literary works make a point and frequently involve strong emotions, such as fear, anxiety, disappointment, joy, sorrow, embarrassment, and anger.

Directions: Write a one-paragraph narrative (with 10-15 sentences) about an event when you experienced a strong emotion. The topic sentence must focus on that emotion. Write in first-person and in past tense (i.e., “I was extremely apprehensive about boarding my first flight”) telling a particularly interesting but brief experience. Limit your paragraph to the major details of the experience. Tell what happened, when it happened, and who was involved. Provide enough background information for your readers to know what you are talking about.

Draft your paragraph using clear, direct sentences. Use relevant, concrete and specific details and examples to add interest, liveliness and power to your writing. Use descriptive words and action verbs, eliminating as many forms of the verb “to be” as possible. Use transitional expressions to indicate time sequencing and smooth out the flow of the narrative. Revise the paragraph as necessary. Work to correct any errors in sentence structure. Be sure the ideas suggested in the topic sentence are explained with details in the supporting sentences which follow.

_________________________________________________________________________________


Writing Assignment #4 - Description of a Person (due session 19)

Teachers often summarize the progress of students; nurses record their patients’ histories; mothers proudly describe their children’s accomplishments; police officers complete reports about crime victims and perpetrators; relatives eulogize loved ones; and managers justify employing a job applicant. These are just a few of the situations where we may be asked to write about people other than ourselves.

Write a five-paragraph essay using specific examples to discuss the reasons you admire a person that you know quite well. Consider this individual’s special qualities, achievements, talents, etc., that set him or her apart from others you know. Develop an introduction which provides a clear thesis and a plan to preview the three major reasons you selected this person. Write three paragraphs of specific, logical and relevant support. Use either extended examples or short, interrelated examples to support the thesis sentence by showing, not telling, the reader the points you are making about your subject. Also provide a conclusion that reinforces the thesis. Provide an appropriate title that does more than simply names the person. Give the readers something to anticipate before they even read the essay.

Consider possible topics to be covered while considering the audience and purpose. You might consider some of the following essay subjects: a friend, a boss, a teacher or coach, a relative, a co-worker or a classmate. Draft your essay using clear, complete and correct sentences. Use relevant, concrete and specific details and examples to add interest and liveliness. Show the reader that this person is more than someone to like; he or she is someone to admire and respect. Use transitional expressions to move the reader from one point to another.

Check for adequate support, coherence and unity. Improve clarity and style by using appropriate English, action verbs, sentence variety and exact language. As a last step, check for faulty sentence structure, agreement problems, tense shifts and misspellings.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Writing Assignment #5 – Argumentative Essay (due session 25)

It has often been said that product advertising, including those on television, radio or in magazines, appeals to our sense of vanity.  Sneakers claim to make you jump higher.  Acne medication will make you look more desirable.  Even certain automobile companies focus on customer appearance rather than on more practical issues like safety.

Directions: Write a five-paragraph essay using specific examples to discuss why or how advertising appeals to our sense of vanity and self-indulgence. Consider different areas of product consumption (i.e. food, electronics, clothing, luxury items). Develop an introduction which provides a clear thesis and a plan to preview the three major reasons you selected this product or service. Write three paragraphs of specific, logical and relevant support. Use either extended examples or short, interrelated examples to support the thesis sentence by showing, not telling, the reader the points you are making about your subject. Also provide a conclusion that reinforces the thesis. Provide an appropriate title that does more than simply names the product or service. Give the readers something to anticipate before they even read the essay.

Consider possible topics to be covered while considering the audience and purpose. Draft your essay using clear, complete and correct sentences. Use relevant, concrete and specific details and examples to add interest and liveliness. Use transitional expressions to move the reader from one point to another.

Check for adequate support, coherence and unity. Improve clarity and style by using appropriate English, action verbs, sentence variety and exact language. As a last step, check for faulty sentence structure, agreement problems, tense shifts and misspellings.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

The Dangers of Relying on
the Computer’s Spell Checker

 

Eye halve a spelling chequer

It came with my pee sea

It plainly marques four my revue

Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

 

Eye strike a key and type a word

And weight four it two say

Weather eye am wrong oar write

It shows me strait a weigh.

 

As soon as a mist ache is maid

It nose bee fore two long

And eye can put the error rite

Its rare lea ever wrong.

 

Eye have run this poem threw it

I am shore your pleased two no

Its letter perfect awl the weigh

My chequer tolled me sew.


NAME_________________________________________

 

ENGLISH 075, SECTION_____________

 

FEEDBACK LOG

Due Date

Assignment

Points

Grade

 

WA #1 (Profile)

10

 

 

WA #2 (Description)

10

 

 

WA #3 (Narration)

10

 

 

WA #4 (Description)

10

 

 

WA #5 (Argument)

10

 

 

Journals

20

 

 

Proofreading/Editing Quiz

20

 

 

Class Participation

10

 

 

TOTAL

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Exam #1

O / P / U

 

 

Final Exam #2

O / P / U

 

 

Final Exam #3 (if nec.)

O / P / U

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINAL GRADE (O=90%, P=70%)

 

O / P / U

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<<http://staff.bcc.edu/faculty_websites/jalexand/feedback.htm>>